Wandering through the Roman ruins of Perga near Antalya, Turkey

We really loved our visit to Turkey, and one of the highlights was all the Greek and Roman ruins we were able to see throughout the country with so few tourists around. Unlike Italy, a lot of the archaeological sites in Turkey are not as well known. There are certain exceptions such as Ephesus, but many historic places are quieter, especially in off-season.

After we reached the southern city of Antalya by bus, we rented a car and drove to Perga (also known as Perge). This city was an important part of the Roman empire and was even mentioned in the Bible. But even before that it was an important Greek city. It was the capital of the region of Pamphylia in ancient times and was once occupied by Alexander the Great.

Antalya is in the South-West part of Turkey

So we hopped in our car and drove to the site, which was only about a 20 minute drive from our place in the city.

There were columns everywhere…
But no people

One of the more interesting things in Perga was the mosaic showing a scene from the Trojan War. It was found just a couple of years ago and recently restored:

https://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/1800-year-old-mosaic-found-in-ancient-city-of-perge-115733

Where the mosaic was found
Information on the sign
The room was locked but I could get a photo through the bars
Roman bath system
Writing can be seen on the broken columns
In the distance you can see the hill

We went up a nearby hill to get a look at the ruins from above. It was a short walk up the path to get to the viewpoint.

Going up to the viewpoint (roofed building near the top)
Getting closer to the top
View from up top
The ruins of Perga
Wide angle of the ruins

The sun was beginning to set and we had to drive back to our place in Antalya, so there was just enough time to visit the stadium back near the entrance of the ruins. It was a nice end to our visit, where we were able to visit a huge set of ancient ruins that were quiet and generally tourist-free.

Entering the stadium
Back in the day it could hold up to 12,000 people
As the sun sets on the stadium

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